Terms of Reference

This page contains the terms of reference for the Disability Data and Evidence Working Group, which were finalised in January 2016.

Purpose

1 The Working Group, co-facilitated by the Office for Disability Issues and Statistics New Zealand, will work with government agencies, the disability sector and other organisations to:

  • Define, clarify and prioritise information needs in order to:
    • improve the lives of disabled people
    • inform better quality monitoring of and reporting on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the New Zealand Disability Strategy and the Disability Action Plan 2014-2018 in future.
  • Support decision-making on resource allocation.

Objectives

2 Key objectives of the Working Group include:

  • Working towards a shared understanding of disability in order to harmonise understandings of disability across government agencies and the wider disability sector.
  • Identification of current high priority areas for data and evidence to underpin the monitoring of and reporting on:
    • CRPD
    • Sustainable Development Goals
    • New Zealand Disability Strategy
    • Disability Action Plan.
  • Identification of current high priority areas for data and evidence to ensure informed decision-making underpins:
    • disability policy formulation
    • mainstream and specialist service planning and evaluation to accommodate the needs of disabled people.
  • Making recommendations on how the capacity to collect and analyse relevant data and evidence on disabled people can be strengthened, given resource constraints.

Membership

3 Membership of the Working Group will be for one year in the first instance. The Working Group will include:

  • Office for Disability representatives
  • Statistics New Zealand representatives
  • representatives from various government agencies, including Social Development, Health, Education, Justice, ACC and Transport
  • representatives from Disabled People’s Organisations
  • disability sector NGO representatives such as those involved in service delivery
  • representatives from universities and research institutes conducting research on disabled people.

Functioning of the Working Group

4 The Working Group will:

  • meet as one group to tackle relevant data issues
  • invite experts on specific issues to attend meetings, when required
  • set up sub-groups to deal with issues requiring highly specialised knowledge (for example, data analytics, information needs for specific disability support services)
  • decide protocols around confidentiality on a case by case basis.

Communications

5 The Working Group will share information in the following ways:

  • The Office for Disability Issues website will be the primary repository of information about the Working Group. Other government agencies can link directly to this website.
  • There will be a dedicated email address for the members of the Working Group.
  • A communications section in accessible formats will be available.

Work programme

6 The Working Group will plan a work programme setting out key deliverables and those responsible for providing them by a specified date.

Note

7 See appendix for relevant recommendations in the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities’ Concluding Observations and the Independent Monitoring Mechanism reports 2012 and 2014.

Appendix: Relevant recommendations in the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities’ Concluding Observations and the Independent Monitoring Mechanism reports 2012 and 2014

The Committee recommends that:

  • Statistics New Zealand produce a report from the Disability Survey comparing the human rights outcomes of disabled women and men with those of non-disabled women and men, and where possible, make data tables available from the Disability Survey 2013 so that data users are able to compare the human rights outcomes of disabled men and women with those of non-disabled men and women (refer paragraph 68).
  • government departments, crown entities and local authorities should collect and publish disaggregated data on people with disabilities in their annual reports (refer paragraph 70).

The Independent Monitoring Mechanism report 2012 recommends that:

  • All government funded research on aspects of women’s lives includes a focus on the experiences of disabled women (refer recommendation 3).
  • The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment provides regular statistics on the employment, unemployment and workforce participation of disabled people (refer recommendation 31).
  • Statistics New Zealand develop a programme of work to ensure that key outcomes data for all New Zealanders are collected in a way that makes it possible to compare the outcomes for disabled and non-disabled people. The programme is to be developed in collaboration with the monitoring mechanism and Disabled People’s Organisations and will include a common understanding of disability (refer key recommendation 2 and recommendation 39).
  • The Ministry of Education develop achievement statistics for disabled students across all compulsory schooling (refer recommendation 40).
  • Statistics New Zealand include the measurement of disabled people’s experiences in the current reviews of the General Social Survey and the Household Labour Force Survey (refer recommendation 41).

The Independent Monitoring Mechanism report 2014 recommends that:

  • Statistics New Zealand, in partnership with DPOs, lead a programme of work to ensure that key outcome and prevalence data are collected in a way that makes it possible to compare outcomes for disabled and non-disabled people. This work should include a common definition of disability and involve consultation with key stakeholders, government and international agencies (refer key recommendation B and recommendation 360).
  • Statistics New Zealand make it a high priority to: (1) produce a report from the Disability Survey 2013 comparing the human rights outcomes of disabled women and men with non-disabled women and men; (2) where possible, make data tables available from the 2013 Disability Survey so that data users are able to compare the human rights outcomes of disabled women and men with non-disabled women and men (refer recommendation 3).
  • Routine collection and reporting of meaningful indicators and data about the experiences of children with disabilities continue to be improved, in partnership with DPOs (refer recommendation 5).

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